Resources

The following resources have been collected to assist faculty, administrators, students, and staff in their efforts to foster, promote, and sustain an inclusive and diverse campus climate at Sonoma State. Content includes resources related to student success; pedagogy and classroom equity; and policies related to diversity, equity, campus climate, and inclusion. If you are looking for resources related to anti-racism, please visit our anti-racism resources page. To offer suggestions for additional resources to be included on this page please email diversity@sonoma.edu

Key Terminology and Concepts

Inequality: Unequal access to opportunities 

Equality: Evenly distributed tools and assistance 

Equity: Custom tools that identify and address inequality

Justice: Fixing the system to offer equal access to both tools and opportunities 

Publications

Policy analysis of issues that will impact campus climate: The upcoming year will be pivotal for public higher education, with decisions by voters and policymakers that will ripple throughout the decade. The 2020 elections will not only determine control of the White House, Congress and some state governments, they will also influence legislative redistricting following the 2020 census. Redistricting will shape federal and state political power until 2032, and the recent Supreme Court decision that federal courts cannot rule on partisan legislative maps only increases the stakes in November.

During the 2016-17 school year, the California State University Chancellor’s Office distributed AHEAD surveys to four stakeholder groups on all CSU campuses to get feedback on the utility, quality, and effectiveness of services on campus to support students with disabilities.

 Venn diagram titled The Lens of Systemic Oppression.
Long Description for the Lens of Systemic Oppression

Our research has shown that all of these variables [first generation status; economic and financial challenges; college readiness; coming from underserved communities] are related to student success and that considering some or all of them in combination can increase the accuracy in our understanding of which students may need additional support to help them on their way to degree completion. A student does not need to have all of these characteristics to be considered historically underserved. In fact, it is possible that a student possessing only one may need assistance during their college career. Our goal is to better understand the complexity of our students and more importantly, identify and provide the support that they need to be successful.

The combination of racial segregation and widening disparities in spending between public selective and public open-access colleges has exacerbated race-based gaps in educational and economic outcomes. Not all students can access the best public colleges and the benefits they confer. The result is that the public higher education system is another factor that is disproportionately keeping Blacks and Latinos from fulfilling their potential, entering the middle class, and living fully in their time—the basic commitments of a democratic capitalist society.

The analysis presented in this report utilizes data from the National Student Clearinghouse —the largest and most comprehensive source of postsecondary enrollment nationwide—to examine how students who started college in 2007 at an MSI move through higher education. The first study to utilize NSC data to examine enrollment and outcome trends at MSIs, this report aims to paint a more complete picture of the contributions of MSIs to the communities they serve.

 


Long Description For "I Don't See Color"

In a nationally representative sample, first-year U.S. college students “somewhat agree,” on average, that they feel like they belong at their school. However, belonging varies by key institutional and student characteristics; of note, racial-ethnic minority and first-generation students report lower belonging than peers at 4-year schools, while the opposite is true at 2-year schools. Further, at 4-year schools, belonging predicts better persistence, engagement, and mental health even after extensive covariate adjustment. Although descriptive, these patterns highlight the need to better measure and understand belonging and related psychological factors that may promote college students’ success and well-being.

In this report we . . . provide arguments for why race-conscious policies that are designed to eliminate racism are necessary. We share data that explains why a focus on income alone may not close gaps in opportunity and outcomes for students of color, particularly Black students and families. And we offer strategies on how leaders and policymakers can design and implement race-conscious policies in higher education.

I examine how and why the social construction of Asian Americans has changed from coolie to model minority over the last century. I examine the role of the U.S. government in creating policies that systematically select particular types of entrants to the United States. Federal immigration policy privileges high-skilled workers, and a disproportionately large number of Asian immigrants are granted the status of lawful permanent resident by the federal government on the basis of employment preferences.

The purpose of this guide is to help people of all gender identities and experiences practice more care toward those on the margins. Trans people must be understood as the authorities on ourselves and the language used to describe us. Not only does this mean that cisgender (non-trans) people need to practice humility and care toward trans people, but it also means that trans people—particularly those with educational, financial, and/or racial privilege—need to practice humility and care toward other trans people—particularly those who are folks of color, low-income, less educated, and/or elders.

The diverse student success infrastructure is by design intentional—leveraging nine distinct but necessarily interrelated functions and features of institutional operations. Some reflect campus units, like human resources and finance, while others represent administrative approaches, like governance and incentive structures. Together they comprise the toolbox for intentional leadership on supporting diverse students (as well as diverse faculty and staff).

This 2-page document outlines 5 steps that are important for local districts and states to consider in order to preserve student well-being and promote instructional equity during the COVID-19 school closures.

Various factors have been identified by previous studies as predictive of citizens’ attitudes toward the police, but there has not been as much effort to establish whether higher educational attainment has any effect on the gap between the various population groups that typically differ in their perception of the police. This study tests for the effect of race and other factors on the attitude of college students toward the police.

This guidance document has been prepared to assist campus decision makers, faculty, administrators, students and staff on providing supportive positive and inclusive campus climates during the COVID-19 crisis.

Timeline dating from the 17th century highlighting trends in public education that have shaped existing dynamics and inequities.

In the last decade, LGBTQ people in the United States—particularly in K-12 and higher education—have gained increasing visibility and some civil rights, including open service in the U.S. military, marriage equality, and some state- or local-level protection against bullying and hate crimes. Yet problems remain. . .Of the many important concerns higher education leaders need to be aware of regarding LGBTQ students, three core issues are 1) identity development, 2) campus climate, and 3) state and national social and policy contexts.

This phenomenological study examined trauma experienced by young men of color, traumas effect on engagement in college, and the young men’s willingness to access counseling. The theoretical and methodological frameworks are Critical Race Theory and Cultural Historical Activity Theory respectively. The findings from the study presented in this paper suggest that young men have a lived experience of trauma that they perceive as normal which impacts their engagement in learning.

Equality, Diversity, Respect, Justice, Tolerance

We cannot afford to wallow in our discomfort regarding issues of race and equity. The Southern Poverty Law Center reported an overwhelming 3,265 incidents of hate or bias in schools throughout the nation in the fall of 2018 alone. I, too, have experienced racial trauma at many of the education institutions where I've worked or studied. Educators have an obligation to confront the harm of racism. That is why we must commit to becoming antiracist educators and to preparing our young people to be antiracist, too. I recommend five actions for teaching for an antiracist future.

This report summarizes the highlights of a national survey of college and university faculty conducted by the Cooperative Institutional Research Program at the Higher Education Research Institute during the 2016–2017 academic year. . . In addition to collecting demographic information, the web-based questionnaire focuses on topics such as how faculty spend their time, how they interact with students, their preferred methods of teaching, their perceptions of institutional climate, their primary sources of stress and satisfaction, and their personal and professional goals.

This paper investigates the most common instructor responses following a tragedy and which of those responses’ students find most helpful. Implications for faculty and faculty developers are discussed.

The report details how institutions are serving first-generation students, the challenges institutions encounter in providing support, and how first- generation students perceive their institutional experience.

Books and Reading Lists

Podcasts

  • 1619 (The New York Times)
    An audio series on how slavery has transformed America, connecting past and present through the oldest form of storytelling.
     
  • Dembe, G. (Host). (2020, March 4). When xenophobia spreads like a virus. [Audio podcast].

Listeners of the National Public Radio podcast discuss whether they had experienced coronavirus-related racism and xenophobia firsthand.

Hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race head-on. We explore how it impacts every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, sports and everything in between.

It’s an election year, and whether people want to admit it or not, race is at the center of every issue -- healthcare, jobs, climate change, the media, and more. Join host Rebecca Carroll for 15 essential conversations about race in a pivotal moment for America. She talks to great thinkers, writers, and artists about faith, representation, white fragility, and how it’s all playing out in 2020.

Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw, Professor of Law at UCLA and Columbia Law School, leading authority in the area of civil rights, race theory, and coined the term "intersectionality."

The Futuro Media Group is an independent nonprofit organization producing multimedia journalism that explores and gives a critical voice to the diversity of the American experience. Based in Harlem and founded in 2010 by award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa, Futuro Media is committed to telling stories often overlooked by mainstream media.

  • Memories of Japanese-American Internment
    In a haunting photo essay for Vogue called “The Memory Keepers,” Bridget Read spoke with women survivors of the Japanese internment, plus their descendants who have become custodians of their family memories. Many of them have deep roots in California agriculture and still work the land. The Good Food podcast is hosted by Evan Kleiman.

  • Native America Calling
    A live call-in program, linking public radio stations, the Internet, and listeners together into a thought-provoking national conversation about issues specific to Native communities.

  • Yo, Is This Racist? (Earwolf)
    Every Wednesday, Andrew Ti, co-host Tawny Newsome, and their guests answer questions from fan-submitted voicemails and emails about whether or not something is, in fact, racist.

Documentary Films

 

The Color of Fear

Webinars

Join state policymakers as they discuss the impacts of COVID-19 on African American students, and policy recommendations to support this student population.

In February 2020 AAPF released the “Under the Blacklight” series featuring the intersectional failures that COVID-19 lays bare. The series features educators, and international thinkers discussing how to build coalition and dismantle hierarchy.

Through Q&A’s, seminars, and panel discussions, faculty from a wide range of disciplines share what they know, and what they are learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This webinar presents some salient trends and issues that complicate the experiences of diverse community college learners in online courses and propose equity-minded teaching and learning strategies for faculty teaching online courses.

This webinar focuses on how to incorporate equity-mindedness services while teaching remotely. Insight and tips from experts are discussed and strategies are offered to help administrators and staff implement practices and policies.

The National Forum on Black Students, Education, and COVID-19 is sponsored by the USC Race and Equity Center and the UCLA Pritzker Center for Strengthening Children and Families. The forum features a distinguished panel discussing equity for Black students in education.

The Office for Civil Rights presents this short webinar on online education and website accessibility.

This webinar focuses on strategies that educators can use to address issues of bias and microaggressions in order to meet the needs of historically underrepresented and under-served students in the online environment.

The webinar, Women of Color Need Courageous Allies in the Academy: An Open Dialogue with White and Black Women, featured six panelists — three Black and three White — who represent a variety of perspectives across higher education.

Films

  • Influential Asian American and Pacific Islander Movies-May is Asian American & Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month, to honor the rich history and accomplishments of AAPIs throughout the history of the United States. AARP is proud to celebrate AAPI Heritage month with articles that showcase AAPI accomplishments and culture.
  • Movies and Documentaries Just Mercy — Based on the life work of civil rights attorney Bryan Stevenson, is one resource we can humbly offer to those who are interested in learning more about the systemic racism that plagues our society.
  • The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson — Marsha P Johnson was an American gay liberation activist. She was also a key player in the 1969 Stonewall uprising. Though her untimely death was initially ruled a suicide, this documentary sees activist Victoria Cruz try to find justice for her friend.
  • The Best of Enemies —The true story of the unlikely relationship between Ann Atwater, an outspoken civil rights activist, and C.P. Ellis, a local Ku Klux Klan leader.
  • Green Book — Set in 1962, the film is inspired by the true story of a tour of the Deep South by African American classical and jazz pianist Don Shirley and Italian American bouncer Frank "Tony Lip" Vallelonga who served as Shirley's driver and bodyguard.
  • Injustice — Focusing on the struggles for justice by the families of people who have died in police custody, beginning with the British case of David Oluwale in 1969, this film shows the wall of secrecy, bureaucracy and lies the grieving families are met with.
  • The Hate U Give —The Hate U Give tells the story of Starr, who witnesses her friend shot dead by police after reaching for his hairbrush. While friends and family from Starr's neighborhood take to the streets to protest, her predominantly white private school friends and boyfriend struggle to understand.
  • Selma —As Black residents peacefully march for their rights to vote alongside Martin Luther King Jr. (played by David Oyelowo), police attack and murder the protestors, using both batons and legislation against them. A telling look into the many, many ways Black people are oppressed.

Movie Poster for The Hate U Give

Videos

  • Implicit Bias — How it affects us and how we push through — This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Everyone makes assumptions about people they don’t know. Melanie will teach us to recognize these assumptions and work toward a common understanding.
  • Systemic Racism Explained — Systemic racism affects every area of life in the US. From incarceration rates to predatory loans, and trying to solve these problems requires changes in major parts of our system. Here's a closer look at what systemic racism is, and how we can solve it.
  • I'm New to Social Justice - This playlist features videos that have feature concepts that are foundational to social justice and the movement to dismantle racism.
  • I'm Ready to Dig Deep - This playlist is for folks who have begun their journey as an anti-racist ally but want to dig deeper into the work.
  • I Want to Be a Better Ally - The videos in the playlist examine some of the common bumps in the road people experience on their path as an ally and how to overcome them.
  • I'm White and I Want to do Better - Are you a white person ready that wants to start your journey as an anti-racist ally but don't know where to start? This playlist is for you.
  • Tim Wise: On White Privilege - Wise provides a non-confrontational explanation of white privilege and the damage it does not only to people of color, but to white people as well.
  • Nate Boyer on suggesting Colin Kaepernick kneel instead of sit during anthem — Former Army Green Beret and NFL player Nate Boyer joins First Take to discuss the current status of NFL players protesting President Donald Trump after he suggested Colin Kaepernick kneel instead of sit during the national anthem over a year ago.

Related Resources

AAPI Data is a nationally recognized publisher of demographic data and policy research on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, with hundreds of news mentions in national and local outlets. Our reputation is built on data and research that is accurate, compelling, and timely. In addition to our news impact, community organizations, government agencies, and decision makers regularly reach out to us, to better understand key aspects of AAPI communities.

Founded in 1996 by Kimberle Crenshaw and Dr. Luke Charles Harris, AAPF is an innovative think tank that connects academics, activists and policy-makers to promote efforts to dismantle structural inequality.

This page provides a compilation of resources that cover a large array of information. From covering general support and information, mutual aid support networks, emergency funds, and mental health details.

This page includes selected resources for sharing the facts and examples of how libraries are interrupting not only the spread of misinformation but also related racism and xenophobia.

The Asian American Advocacy Fund’s mission is to advocate for the civil and human rights of Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Native Hawaiians in Georgia. Through a combination of policy advocacy at local, state, and federal levels, and by supporting candidates that believe in our values, we fight to create a better Georgia for us all.

Asian Pacific Americans in Higher Education is dedicated to enhancing the educational opportunities for Asian and Pacific American students; promoting and supporting the hiring, retention, and advancement of qualified Asian and Pacific American faculty, staff, and administrators; and creating a better understanding of issues in the public affecting Asian and Pacific Americans in higher education

The mission of the Antiracist Research & Policy Center (ARPC) is to support the innovation and enactment of antiracist policies at the local, state and national level by connecting AU faculty, students, and staff to the Washington, DC, and wider communities.

"The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s observance of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May focuses on combating xenophobia together with diverse thought leaders to bridge communities in dialogue. Please visit this page regularly to access these upcoming resources in May and beyond."

"We encourage all who have witnessed or experienced micro-aggressions, bullying, harassment, hate speech, or violence to help us document. The more information we have, the better we can respond and prevent further incidents from occurring."

Founded by Ibram X. Kendir, the mission of the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research is to convene researchers and practitioners from various disciplines to figure out novel and practical ways to understand, explain, and solve seemingly intractable problems of racial inequity and injustice.

Fear and anxiety about a disease can lead to social stigma toward people, places, or things. The CDC provide Information on how to reduce the stigma.

This guide was prepared for faculty teaching remotely during times of crisis. It offers advice, lessons, and strategy to make your classroom as effective for learning.

 


Long Description for The Game of Getting Legal

Define American is a narrative and culture change organization that uses media and the power of storytelling to transcend politics and shift the conversation about immigrants, identity, and citizenship in a changing America.

"Our mission at the Greater Good Science Center is to elevate the human potential for compassion. But that does not mean we deny or dismiss the human potential for violence, particularly toward marginalized or dehumanized groups."

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) was established in 1986 with a founding membership of eighteen institutions. Because of HACU’s exemplary leadership on behalf of the nation’s youngest and fastest-growing population, the Association rapidly grew in numbers and national impact.

HSF empowers families with the knowledge and resources to successfully complete a higher education, while providing scholarships and support services to as many exceptional students as possible.

The Academy is dedicated to helping participants boost their strategic diversity leadership skills, disrupt the status quo at their institutions, and become innovative game changers around issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

INSIGHT Into Diversity is the oldest and largest diversity magazine and website in higher education today. For over 45 years, INSIGHT Into Diversity has connected potential employees with institutions and businesses choosing to embrace a workforce more reflective of our local and national communities.

This website offers resources on how to address COVID-19 racism and microaggressions using facts. A variety of tools and resources are provided for higher education professionals.

Introducing a Web-Based Index plus Three Essays on Best Practices in Latino Education in the United States

Find your next great opportunity in higher education 

"The National Equity Project is a leadership and systems change organization committed to increasing the capacity of people to achieve thriving, self-determining, educated, and just communities. Our mission is to transform the experiences, outcomes, and life options for children and families who have been historically underserved by our institutions and systems."

Our Mission: Serving immediate needs. Supporting long-term solutions. Our Vision: Strong, self-sufficient Native American communities.

The Holocaust & Genocide Memorial Grove at Sonoma State University is designed to honor survivors and victims of the genocides committed throughout the world, including the Native American Genocide, the Armenian Genocide, the Jewish Holocaust, the Cambodian Genocide, the Rwandan Genocide, and the current-day genocide in Darfur. Another aim of the monument is to recognize educators, scholars and activists working for awareness, tolerance and human rights across the globe.

This guide provides access to a selected list of resources pertaining to LGBTQ+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning/Queer plus) issues and interests.

The purpose of Teach Mideast is to provide free and accessible, high-quality information and resources to enable K-14 educators to teach about the Middle East in social studies and introductory area studies classes. We aim to do this through presentations and workshops for students, educators, and other civic leaders. Our core tool is this website, which uses digital media resources to reach users in a globally-connected society. Working in conjunction with Title VI university outreach centers, scholars, area specialists, and teachers themselves, Teach Mideast provides tools and support to better inform students about the Middle East and Muslim world today so they are adequately equipped to handle difficult policy decisions in the future.

GLAAD rewrites the script for LGBTQ acceptance. As a dynamic media force, GLAAD tackles tough issues to shape the narrative and provoke dialogue that leads to cultural change. GLAAD protects all that has been accomplished and creates a world where everyone can live the life they love.

The USC Race and Equity Center is a dynamic research and organizational improvement center that helps professionals in educational institutions, corporations, and other contexts strategically develop and achieve equity goals, better understand and correct climate problems, avoid and recover from racial crises, and engineer sustainable cultures of inclusion and respect.